The Healing Frequencies of Sound

Our minds register the vibrations of the sounds we hear around us, our bodies then resonate with it, reminding us of harmony. “If you want to find the secrets of the Universe, think in terms of energy, frequency and vibration. ” – Nikola Tesla There is a YouTube channel, Healing Vibrations, has numerous videos of […]

The Healing Frequencies of Sound

8 Incredible Ways to Increase Your Intelligence

For ages, it has been thought that people are born with a certain level of intelligence. But, researchers have now found that you can elevate this potential and become more intelligent. In fact, learning new skills can help your brain build new neural pathways, which allow it to work better and faster. – Read a […]

8 Incredible Ways to Increase Your Intelligence

Hiking in Anza Borrego was amazing specially on new years eve. Did goat trail hike which was very interesting saw so much quartz rocks beautiful the views were amazing and breathtaking. But you really need to be prepared for a hike like this you must have obviously water first aid kit just in case for those falls scrapes. You gotta wear the right hiking shoes/boots and the right clothing hats or something that will give you shade for the most part..

What Role Does Evolution Play in Mental Illness?

brain

Recent work has started to reveal the role of natural selection, offering a glimpse at how the genetic underpinning of mental illness has changed over time.

Many psychiatric disorders are polygenic, which means that they can involve hundreds or thousands of genes and DNA mutations, writes Nature. It can be difficult to track how so many genetic regions evolved, and such studies require large genome data sets. However, human genome databases are now enabling researchers to look for possible connections that might have driven their emergence and development. Others are looking to Neanderthal genetic sequences to help inform the picture of these disorders, as well as cognitive abilities, in humans.

One project in particular discovered that evolution selected for DNA variants thought to protect against schizophrenia. The study was led by Barbara Stranger of the University of Chicago in Illinois, who looked at hundreds of thousands of human genomes using a statistical method that identified signals of selection over the past 2,000 years. There were no signs of selection in genetic regions associated with any other mental illness.

Over the course of evolution, it has been suggested by Bernard Crespi, an evolutionary biologist at Simon Fraser University that genes involved in language could malfunction and result in schizophrenia in a small percentage of the population.

In addition, a team led by human geneticist, Renato Polimanti at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, is attempting to discover link between environmental factors, mental illnesses and behavioural traits.

Polimanti and his colleagues looked at 2,455 DNA samples from individuals at 23 sites across Europe and quantified each person’s overall genetic risk for mental disorders, such as autism, and personality traits, such as extraversion. They then calculated whether that risk was associatd with certain environmental factors, such as rainfall, winter temperatures or the prevalence of infectious disease, exploring the idea that these factors might have been involved in selection for the human traits.

Their results revealed that people who live in European regions with relatively lower winter temperatures, were slightly more genetically prone to schizophrenia. Polimanti suggests that if genes that helped people tolerate could have been inadvertently carried along during evolution as a “fellow traveller.”

Tony Capra, an evolutionary geneticist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, Polimanti, explained, “This was a nice first attempt to put some environmental context.” He now plans to repeat the study in other parts of the world.

Trying to make sense of the roles of genetics and the environment can be a tough task, largely due to unknown environmental conditions in the past could have selected for traits that were advantageous then, but considered negative today. Moreover, other evolutionary factors could even contribute to the mental illness indirectly.

Sanger explained that an overactive immune system is thought to be involved in many psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but a stronger immune system would have made human ancestors more resistant to diseases.

Although the study of how mental illness evolved is still at an early stage, the ability to use massive human genome databases is an exciting step forward, concluded Capra. His team  plans to task advantage of this by carrying out a survey of genetic areas that differ between Neanderthals and humans, searching for differences in how the genes are expressed.

Migraines and fatigue may start in the gut, experts say

 

If you suffer from migraines, you know how debilitating the piercing pain, sensitivity to light and sound and nausea can be.

According to the Migraine Research Foundation, about 38 million people suffer from them and more than 4 million who get them on a daily basis.

What you may not realize and what your doctor probably isn’t telling you is that  migraines may be linked to your gut health. More specifically, the cause of migraines can be caused by “gut hyper-permeability,” a condition often dubbed leaky gut syndrome.

 

“Migraines are the result of a perfect storm,” said Dr. Vincent M. Pedre, an integrative and functional medicine doctor in New York City and author of “Happy Gut: The Cleansing Program to Help You Lose Weight, Gain Energy, and Eliminate Pain.”

Dehydration, not sleeping well, blood sugar fluctuations, artificial sweeteners, even a glass of wine can cause migraines. For women, hormonal shifts at the beginning of their menstrual cycles can be the culprit. For men, , an age-related testosterone deficiency known as “andropause” can trigger an incident.

Yet experts agree there are also inflammatory factors at play which can lead to gut hyperpermeability.

Leaky gut is activated by zonulin, a compound that our bodies produce to open up the tight junctions or the cells that line the inside of the intestines to let nutrients through.

When those tight junctions open up too much and allow undigested food particles and pathogens to get through, it elicits an immune response that can cause migraines.

Frequent use of antibiotics, an imbalance of good and bad bacteria, an overgrowth of yeast and stress and food sensitivities can all increase the hyperpermeability of the gut.

Up to a third of people with leaky gut may not even experience GI issues, a common symptom of leaky gut syndrome, Pedre said.

What’s more, conventional NSAID pain killers like ibuprofen also increase intestinal permeability within 24 hours of taking them and also when they’re taken long term, according to a review in the Journal of Gastroenterology.

Stress, in particular, affects the production of gastric enzymes, which aid digestion. If you’re not sufficiently breaking down proteins and your gut is hyperpermeable, your immune system is exposed to partially digested proteins that lead to an immune response.

Foreign proteins can also make their way into the bloodstream because of your own unique genetic predisposition.

“Your immune system is essentially going to be attacked by those foreign proteins and your tissues could look similar to those proteins,” said Shawn Stevenson, a nutritionist in St. Louis, Mo. and bestselling author of “Sleep Smarter: 21 Essential Strategies To Sleep Your Way To A Better Body, Better Health and Bigger Success.”

The same immune response that causes migraines can also lead to fatigue, along with the auras that precede migraines by one or two days or after the migraine has passed, Pedre said.

Gluten can increase gut permeability

“Most people can eat bread and gluten for their lives and not have anything they know to be a problem but that it doesn’t mean it’s good for them,” Stevenson said.

Although food sensitivities can trigger migraines, gluten, in particular, can cause hyperpermeability of the gut whether you have celiac disease, are gluten sensitive, or not, Pedre said.

If you suspect you have leaky gut syndrome, here’s what you can do about it.

See your doctor.

Leaky gut is controversial and not typically validated by conventional medical doctors so you should try to see a functional medicine doctor, integrative physician or homeopath  who can help to identify the underlying cause of your migraines.

Although there’s a test—the lactulose mannitol test—to screen for gut permeability, it’s not perfect. Instead, your doctor will probably run a test to look for food sensitivities.

“If a person comes back with a whole bunch of foods they are reactive too, we know that they have a leaky gut,” Pedre said.

Do an elimination diet.

“One very powerful way to lower our inflammation in the body is through the diet,” Pedre said.

Talk to your doctor about a four-week elimination diet which excludes common food triggers and includes anti-inflammatory foods. Then slowly re-introduce the trigger foods and pay close attention to your symptoms. Although gluten might be the culprit, it can be something as inconspicuous as cinnamon, Pedre said.

Drink plenty of water.

Hydrating and re-hydrating after a workout or on a hot summer day is key to ward off migraines. When you’re dehydrated, the tiny capillaries in the brain get smaller, which makes it painful for the blood to pass through and circulate around the brain, Stevenson said.

Try bone broth.
Bone broth is trendy and experts say drinking it can help restore the gut microbiome. Chia seeds and okra are good choices too.

Take supplements

Supplements such as aloe vera gel powder, L-glutamine, deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), fish oil and curcumin can help.

Eat probiotic-rich foods.

Try adding foods rich in probiotics into your diet like sauerkraut, kimchi and kefir as well as prebiotic foods like Jerusalem artichokes, garlic and onion.

Reduce stress.

It’s one of the most difficult things to make room for in your life, but stress-reduction activities like yoga, meditation and spending time in nature are important to restore gut health and prevent migraines.

“If you only change your diet but you’re still living in this rushed, stressed out way, then you’re missing part of the picture,” Pedre said. 

love your gut kit

“What I wish people would know is that this is something that people cannot get used to.

parkland-florida-school-shooting-03-ap-jc-180214_16x9_608We live in a world of so many distractions that we fail to give our own kids the proper care, love and understanding of what it is that they are going through at their age.

We have become so accustomed to just giving them their wants instead of their needs.

we try to fill in the that void with temporary things such as tablets, game consoles, and many materialistic things that will only make them happy temporarily.

Love and understand your children so that they can share and give in return that love and care to one another.

Everyone’s off-target. Another horrible shooting, another young shooter. Eighteen years of death since West Paducah, Kentucky first warned of an epidemic. Finally, there’s invigorated debate about gun control and mental health care. But, there’s a glaring problem.

Guns and mental illness are merely attributes of these shootings, they are not the reason why numerous kids are killing people. It is time we stopped fooling ourselves and started asking why our youth are so disaffected that they’re lashing out, murderously, at the world we’ve given them.

While increased regulation and improved mental health may decrease the number of deaths from these tragedies, to suggest they are solutions to a society-wide epidemic of youth killing people is a logical fallacy: Guns don’t cause people to kill, and one individual’s illness does not create a nationwide epidemic of unprecedented killings.

Our children are disaffected because they are angry, and have every right to be, and no one’s listening to them. Why, because, we have raised them in a society that is in blatant moral contradiction of what we teach them, and yet we deny it. We tell them “do unto others,” to live equally, and in peace, while everything we do proves otherwise.

As a musician and poet, it’s my job to take the pulse of my country and world and express it in service to the betterment of humankind. From the day that Michael Carneal walked into Heath High School on December 1st, 1997, I knew something was terribly wrong. Something bigger than guns or individual illness.

I immersed myself in the issue of school shootings, and toured the country singing to and speaking with thousands of youth the same age as the shooters, would-be killers. In my song “West Kentucky” about Carneal’s rampage, I reflected as a southern boy reared in gun culture aware that in this disaffection, something horrifying was at our doorstep:

“Now this young boy is charged with murder
And not one tear flows from his eyes
When they asked him for a reason
All he says is I don’t know why…
I myself am from Virginia
And one thing I know is clear
Regardless of a reason
This did not used to happen here.”

Immediately after the Columbine shootings occurred, I wrote my song “The Darling Son,” a song based on an ancient ballad called ‘Edward’ or ‘The Twa Brothers,’ in which a mother questions her son who has killed his brother and fails in his attempts to falsify his story.

In my song, the mother confronts her son who has just killed his classmates, shortly before he kills himself:

“Where, oh where did you get that gun? Son, please talk to me.
I got it from your husband, mom, who rarely talks to me.
But where did you learn to be so cruel? Son, please talk to me.
I learned it in the books at school that taught me history.
But where did you learn to kill my son, son please talk to me.
I learned it from this great, great land, that kills across the sea.
Oh, where will you go, my only one? Son, please talk to me.
I’m going far beyond the sun, where no one’s eyes can see.”

The thousands of high school and college student that you hear in this live recording, all the same age-group as our school shooters, are cheering each word because the song is giving voice to what is bothering them, to something they live with everyday that is making them angry, but that no adult has ever admitted to them.

Everywhere I’ve gone, youth have come up to me after shows, often in tears, thanking me, asking if they can hug me, telling me I’m the first adult who’s ever talked to them about the truth of their world, thoughts they say they’re afraid to express openly to adults they think are not receptive.

Our children are not stupid. Armed with the internet, they have access to more information than prior generations could ever imagine. As much we may like to ignore it, we cannot pull the wool over their eyes as though it were 1975.

We have given them a world in which they know millions have been killed or made refugees in a war waged over oil that is causing global warming, voted for by politicians bought by corporate interests, while their own parents, many of whom are divorced, work day and night to make ends meet, unavailable to them, while pop culture sells unprecedented wealth, debauchrery and violence to them daily. And we act as though the problem is guns and mental health.

We have created a society that is morally bankrupt, and the victims are our children who have lost faith in authority due to our moral duplicity. This is the cause of school shootings.

By failing to engage our youth in honest conversation about their world as they see it, we sentence the most sensitive, already neglected, but often most gifted, inquisitive of our youth, to despair. If we continue this denial, we will have more of these children pushed to the point of breaking, regardless of gun control.

Every child of ours could become a killer, or a changemaker. It is up to us to give them the necessary moral consistency, inspiration and support to become the latter.

But, in the 18 years since the dawn of school shootings, I have yet to see our politicians or mainstream media respond to one of these tragedies by asking the youth themselves what it is they are angry about. Now’s the time to start.

We need a campaign to listen to our youth. We need to work with and inspire them to channel their justified feelings into groundbreaking work for good before it festers in them unresolved and explodes. I’m prepared to dedicated myself to the effort.

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